2014 S2 Results R5

Thursday 28/08/2014

Brothers 28 def by Pink Pirates 36
Rob 12, Michelle 18

Sharks 44 def Clownfish 30
Phillip 16, Sam 24

Beached Az 28 def by The Nuts 54
Julia 18, Tony 20

Plankton 40 def Ducks 30
Cathy 22, Cole/Ron/Andrew each 8

The ladder and top scoring rankings have also been updated under Statistics.

Rule Highlight of the Week

Last week, I highlighted the part of the barging rules that concerns the defender’s arms (15.18.2). Please re-read that post and, more importantly, read Section 15.18-15.21 of the Regulations, which deal with “Physical Contact & Cylinder Related Minor Fouls”.

This week is about the barging rule in general. Section 15.19 refers to barging a static defender, while 15.21 deals with barging in motion. The concept of the ‘cylinder’, which is the shoulder-width space around the person, is important when determining the barging violation. Barging can be called on physical contact, but also on movement into the defender’s cylinder.

While barging a static defender (15.20) is generally straight forward, what happens when both players are in motion without contact but in each other’s cylinder is not always obvious (read 15.21). Simply said; if an attacking player moves forward or sideways into the defender’s cylinder, that is barging. If the attacker is static or moves backwards and the defender moves into the attacker’s cylinder, that is impeding (although usually more leniency is given here, since as the ‘follower’ it is harder to know when to stop). Note, that the interpretation of forward/backward depends on the placement of the defender. I.e. the defender is usually placed between the attacker and the defended basket. But, if the defender is placed behind the attacker (e.g. a double-team defence) and the attacker swims backward into the defender, that is also barging.

Since the in-motion/non-contact situations happen very often, we need to keep those rules practical. Therefore, umpires generally only call consistent barging. E.g. if the attacker tries to swim closer to the basket and does so by diagonally swimming forward into the cylinder of the defender (so not arms, as discussed last week), then the umpires generally wait (for 1 or 2 seconds) and see if the attacker stops. If the attacker consistently keeps moving into the defender’s cylinder in this situation, then a barging foul is called.

Similarly if this happens in reverse, with the attacker retreating and the defender consistently swimming forward into the attacker, that is impeding. The in-motion/non-contact scenarios tend to be considered more severely when they occur closer to the attacking area/basket.

As you can see, contact & barging rules are not simple considering the many different possible scenarios. Umpires must consider on- & off-the-ball situations (with on-the-ball being considered more severely than off-the-ball), general impact, flow of the game, intent, etc. etc. So while the barging rules have been discussed, agreed and documented to a large extent, the ongoing need for careful & consistent interpretation by the umpires and understanding & cooperation from the players are ultimately essential.

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About Water Basketball Tasmania
Water Basketball is a sport developed by The Hobart Aquatic Centre. It involves two teams of 6 players, who pass the ball down the pool to their goal end, which is a hoop similar to basketball. Each player wears flippers (and a cap to identify which team they are playing for). Goals are scored as two or three points depending how far from the goals you are.

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